I Don’t Want Your Money

Seriously. There are times when you and I are just not destined to enter into a business relationship.

My business is teaching people how to sew, and puh-leeze don’t get me wrong—I LOVE teaching. Almost as much as I love sewing. Nothing makes me want to jump out of bed faster than the prospect of seeing that “AHA!” moment click in a student’s brain. (Well, maybe a double tall latte. 😉 )

Sew Maris Sew Camp students

But sometimes I am not the right teacher for you, or not the right teacher for your child. Sometimes, I just don’t want to take your money.

1. I am a process sewist. I like to sew things together well. I like to use advanced, couture, designer techniques because I think they often (tho not always) produce a better-looking finished garment. For me, the process definitely matters.

It is OK with me if your type of sewing is to lay a pair of pants/leggings/underwear on an old T-shirt, cut around it, and sew it up any old which way. Have at it! Have fun! Just don’t ask me to teach you to sew that way. That is not my way. You don’t have to like my way; you don’t have to agree with my way; you can sew any way you like and I promise not to judge you. I also promise that if I am your teacher, I will show you how to sew MY way. Because it’s all I got for you, sister.

2. Older is usually better when it comes to machine sewing. Kids can start hand sewing much earlier than they can sew on a machine. After a few lessons or a few days of sew camp, I expect my young students to be able to wind a bobbin, thread their own sewing machine, troubleshoot basic problems, and read simple, written instructions. Can your seven year-old really do all that? Most can’t. It is not because they are not smart enough or mature enough; they just haven’t had enough time on this earth to develop the necessary manual dexterity, problem-solving, reading comprehension of written, technical information, and concentration skills to be able to excel at sewing. Even if they beg you, waiting another year (or two!!) will always result in your money being better spent. What’s the hurry, anyway?

3. Sewing birthday parties. Please see number 1 above. I never do sewing birthday parties for adults or children. Sugar (or wine)+excitement+lots of chatting = wrong environment for learning. Not my jam. Not at all.

Sew Maris Sew Camp students

If you are a super-sewing-nerd who loves to geek out about which needle is best for which type of fabric, can spend hours in a fabric store without getting bored, love to read sewing books as much as mystery novels, then I might just be the sewing teacher for you. Schedule a private sewing lesson for yourself or a sew camp for your child, and we’ll see what kind of business relationship develops. Sometimes, actually often, my students become my fast friends. Because we share the love of all things sewing.

Happy sewing!

Maris

 

10 Responses to I Don’t Want Your Money

  1. Agreed. If you sign up for a certain kind of course or program expect to learn that instructor’s way. That’s what you are paying for, their expertise and process. If that isn’t for you find someone who is. But do not expect the teacher to change their process and method to accommodate the way you think should be taught.

  2. I completely understand! I have family members that keep wanting me to teach their kids but the kids don’t want to learn. How is that going to work? Or they say they don’t want to make pj bottoms because they want a ballgown instead. LOL. BTW: I really love the pictures of your students and their finished projects. They all look so happy and proud and they make me smile!!!

    • Oye, that is another category of student I should have added to the list, Vicki – the kids with zero interest and the parents have an agenda!

      Tell the “ballgown kids” they have to play Beethoven’s Ninth during their first piano lesson. 😉

  3. Hi Maris!
    Do they *really* ask you kids birthday sewing classes? I mean: how can they think it could work?
    I had fun reading your thoughts, you always have interesting perspectives 😉
    Irene
    Serger Pepper

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